Mark Churms Original Paintings

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Mark Churms produced a large number of original paintings for Cranston Fine Arts over a ten year period, and many of these great paintings are now offered for sale at fantastic trade prices.  You cannot beat this great selection and these great prices.

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40 items on 2 pages

 Crocket is shown at the Barricades at 6am on the 5th March 1836. The siege of the Alamo ended on March 6th, when the Mexican army attacked while the Alamo defenders were sleeping.   The garrison defenders awakened,  and the final fight began.  One of the women who were gathered in the chapel witnessed Crockett  running to his post, Crockett paused briefly in the chapel to pray.  But when the Mexican soldiers breached the outer walls of the Alamo complex, most of Crocket and the defending Texians fell back to the barracks and the chapel area which had been the plan.  Davy Crockett and his men were too far from the barracks to be able to take shelter and were the last remaining defenders within the mission to be in the open. The men desperatly defended the low wall in front of the church,  using their rifles as clubs and using there knives in close combat as the Mexican troops were too close and made it impossible to reload their rifles. After a volley of fire and a charge with fixed bayonets, Mexican soldiers pushed the few remaining Texans back toward the church and soon after the Battle for the Alamo had ended after lasting 90 minutes.  It is said that the body of Crockett was surrounded by up to 12 Mexican soldiers bodies and one with Crocketts knife in him.
Crocketts Last Sunrise, at the Battle of the Alamo by Mark Churms. (P)


Crocket is shown at the Barricades at 6am on the 5th March 1836. The siege of the Alamo ended on March 6th, when the Mexican army attacked while the Alamo defenders were sleeping. The garrison defenders awakened, and the final fight began. One of the women who were gathered in the chapel witnessed Crockett running to his post, Crockett paused briefly in the chapel to pray. But when the Mexican soldiers breached the outer walls of the Alamo complex, most of Crocket and the defending Texians fell back to the barracks and the chapel area which had been the plan. Davy Crockett and his men were too far from the barracks to be able to take shelter and were the last remaining defenders within the mission to be in the open. The men desperatly defended the low wall in front of the church, using their rifles as clubs and using there knives in close combat as the Mexican troops were too close and made it impossible to reload their rifles. After a volley of fire and a charge with fixed bayonets, Mexican soldiers pushed the few remaining Texans back toward the church and soon after the Battle for the Alamo had ended after lasting 90 minutes. It is said that the body of Crockett was surrounded by up to 12 Mexican soldiers bodies and one with Crocketts knife in him.


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 Depicting Polish Lancers escorting a generals carriage as they pass through an infantry bivouac during the Hundred Days Campaign.
The Generals Escort by Mark Churms. (P)


Depicting Polish Lancers escorting a generals carriage as they pass through an infantry bivouac during the Hundred Days Campaign.


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 A Voltigeur corporal, 2nd battalion, 4th regiment etranger, Holland 1813.
Tireur D Elite by Mark Churms. (P)


A Voltigeur corporal, 2nd battalion, 4th regiment etranger, Holland 1813.


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 Acting Assistant Commissary J.L. Dalton commissariat and transport department and colour sergeant F. Bourne, during the battle at the front wall about 6pm at Rorkes Drift. Frank Bourne was born  on the 27th April 1854  in Balcombe Sussex, when Bourne was 18 he joined the 24th Regiment in 1872, being promoted to Corporal in 1875 and Sergeant in 1878.  Sergeant Bourne was promoted to Colour Sergeant soon after the rgeiment arrived in Natal.  Colour Sgt bourne was part of B company whose job was to guard the hospital at Rorkes Drift.  Colour Sgt Bourne played a major role in keeping the defending troops effective.  Colour Sgt Bourne was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his role in the defence, and it is surprising that he was not awarded a Victoria Cross as 11 were awarded for the defence. Col Sgt Bourne retired form the army in 1907, but  joined again for WW1, serving in Dublin.  He was the last survivor of Rorkes Drift, passing away at the age of 91 on the 8th May 1945 by coincidence being VE day.
Pot That Fellow by Mark Churms. (P)


Acting Assistant Commissary J.L. Dalton commissariat and transport department and colour sergeant F. Bourne, during the battle at the front wall about 6pm at Rorkes Drift. Frank Bourne was born on the 27th April 1854 in Balcombe Sussex, when Bourne was 18 he joined the 24th Regiment in 1872, being promoted to Corporal in 1875 and Sergeant in 1878. Sergeant Bourne was promoted to Colour Sergeant soon after the rgeiment arrived in Natal. Colour Sgt bourne was part of B company whose job was to guard the hospital at Rorkes Drift. Colour Sgt Bourne played a major role in keeping the defending troops effective. Colour Sgt Bourne was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his role in the defence, and it is surprising that he was not awarded a Victoria Cross as 11 were awarded for the defence. Col Sgt Bourne retired form the army in 1907, but joined again for WW1, serving in Dublin. He was the last survivor of Rorkes Drift, passing away at the age of 91 on the 8th May 1945 by coincidence being VE day.


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 Depicting Private Hook and Private Williams, B Company, 2nd Battalion, 24th Foot inside the burning hospital at Rorkes Drift, 7pm January 1879. At about 6 pm the Zulus first forced their way into the hospital building where some thirty patients were defended by a handful of able-bodied men. A running fight ensued as the patients were evacuated from room to room, a desperate struggle made all the more terrible when the Zulus set fire to the thatched roof. Here Private Alfred Henry Hook holds Zulus of the uThulwana regiment at bay whilst Private John Williams helps a patient escape, Hook received a head wound when a spear struck off his helmet.
Pinned Like Rats in a Hole by Mark Churms. (P)


Depicting Private Hook and Private Williams, B Company, 2nd Battalion, 24th Foot inside the burning hospital at Rorkes Drift, 7pm January 1879. At about 6 pm the Zulus first forced their way into the hospital building where some thirty patients were defended by a handful of able-bodied men. A running fight ensued as the patients were evacuated from room to room, a desperate struggle made all the more terrible when the Zulus set fire to the thatched roof. Here Private Alfred Henry Hook holds Zulus of the uThulwana regiment at bay whilst Private John Williams helps a patient escape, Hook received a head wound when a spear struck off his helmet.


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 Corporal Allen and Corporal Lyons, B. Company 2nd Battalion 24th Foot Rorkes Drift Back Wall, 6pm January 22nd 1879.  After the initial Zulu assault on the back wall of the post failed at about 4.30pm, a fire-fight broke out between Zulu snipers posted on the terraces of the Shiyane (Oskarsberg) Hill and the defenders posted behind the barricade of wagons and mealie-bags. This section of the wall as commanded by Sergeant Henry Gallagher, of B Company. At about 6 pm, Corporal Lyons was leaning over the barricade to aim when he was hit in the neck by a bullet which paralysed him, as his friend, Corporal Allen, bent to help him, Allen too was shot through the arm. In the foreground Corporal Attwood of the Army Service Corps distributes ammunition. The wall was abandoned shortly after and the British retired to the small are in front of the storehouse. Allen was later awarded the VC, and Attwood the DCM.  He was born at Churcham, Gloucestershire, and served for five years in the Monmouthshire Militia before joining the 24th Regiment. He served through the Kaffir War 1877-8 before his bravery at Rorkes Drift for which he was presented with the Victoria Cross by Lord Wolseley on August 3rd 1879. He later served in the 1st Volunteers Battalion Royal Fusiliers.
Wounded by Mark Churms. (P)


Corporal Allen and Corporal Lyons, B. Company 2nd Battalion 24th Foot Rorkes Drift Back Wall, 6pm January 22nd 1879. After the initial Zulu assault on the back wall of the post failed at about 4.30pm, a fire-fight broke out between Zulu snipers posted on the terraces of the Shiyane (Oskarsberg) Hill and the defenders posted behind the barricade of wagons and mealie-bags. This section of the wall as commanded by Sergeant Henry Gallagher, of B Company. At about 6 pm, Corporal Lyons was leaning over the barricade to aim when he was hit in the neck by a bullet which paralysed him, as his friend, Corporal Allen, bent to help him, Allen too was shot through the arm. In the foreground Corporal Attwood of the Army Service Corps distributes ammunition. The wall was abandoned shortly after and the British retired to the small are in front of the storehouse. Allen was later awarded the VC, and Attwood the DCM. He was born at Churcham, Gloucestershire, and served for five years in the Monmouthshire Militia before joining the 24th Regiment. He served through the Kaffir War 1877-8 before his bravery at Rorkes Drift for which he was presented with the Victoria Cross by Lord Wolseley on August 3rd 1879. He later served in the 1st Volunteers Battalion Royal Fusiliers.


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Lt. John Rouse Merriot Chard, Royal Engineers.At about 3.30 on the afternoon of 22nd January 1879, Lieutenant John Rouse Merriot Chard, Royal Engineers, was supervising repairs on the military pont on the Mzinyathi river, at the border crossing at Rorkes Drift, when survivors brought news  that the advanced British camp at Isandhlwana had been over-run by the Zulus, and that a wing of the Zulu army was on its way to attack Rorkes Drift. Chard ordered Driver Robson to pack up the wagon and return to the mission station, where a stockpile of supplies was under the guard of B Company, 2/24th Regiment. Chard, in consultation with his fellow officers, made the historic decision to make a stand at Rorkes Drift.
Eve of Distinction by Mark Churms. (P)


Lt. John Rouse Merriot Chard, Royal Engineers.At about 3.30 on the afternoon of 22nd January 1879, Lieutenant John Rouse Merriot Chard, Royal Engineers, was supervising repairs on the military pont on the Mzinyathi river, at the border crossing at Rorkes Drift, when survivors brought news that the advanced British camp at Isandhlwana had been over-run by the Zulus, and that a wing of the Zulu army was on its way to attack Rorkes Drift. Chard ordered Driver Robson to pack up the wagon and return to the mission station, where a stockpile of supplies was under the guard of B Company, 2/24th Regiment. Chard, in consultation with his fellow officers, made the historic decision to make a stand at Rorkes Drift.


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 With Edward I absent from Scotland the land soon slips once more into open insurrection. Though not of noble birth, William Wallace, by brutally slaying the Sheriff of Lanark in vengeance for the murder of Wallaces new bride and her servants, soon comes to embody the Scottish Nationalist cause. Through his popularity and military skill, he is able to rapidly unify the rebellious bands into a single, cohesive fighting force. An English army is sent north to defeat the Scots and capture Wallace and the only noble to come to Wallaces assistance, is his friend Andrew Murray. Other Scottish landowners are too timid and fear the consequences.  The armies meet at Stirling and the English begin to deploy across the narrow wooden bridge which spans the River Forth. Whilst the English commanders bicker about their battle plan, Wallace seizes the moment and blows his horn. Upon this signal, the massed ranks of Scottish spearmen charge forward across the open boggy ground towards the bridge!
William Wallace Before the Battle of Stirling Bridge by Mark Churms. (P)


With Edward I absent from Scotland the land soon slips once more into open insurrection. Though not of noble birth, William Wallace, by brutally slaying the Sheriff of Lanark in vengeance for the murder of Wallaces new bride and her servants, soon comes to embody the Scottish Nationalist cause. Through his popularity and military skill, he is able to rapidly unify the rebellious bands into a single, cohesive fighting force. An English army is sent north to defeat the Scots and capture Wallace and the only noble to come to Wallaces assistance, is his friend Andrew Murray. Other Scottish landowners are too timid and fear the consequences. The armies meet at Stirling and the English begin to deploy across the narrow wooden bridge which spans the River Forth. Whilst the English commanders bicker about their battle plan, Wallace seizes the moment and blows his horn. Upon this signal, the massed ranks of Scottish spearmen charge forward across the open boggy ground towards the bridge!


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Battle of Prestonpans.  Bonnie Prince Charlie, after landing at Glenfinnan, in his bid to gain the British Throne.  Lord George Murray with an army of 2,000 Jacobites marched southward where they were meet  at Prestonpans by General  Sir John Cope and a Royal army of 3,000 men  On the 21st September.  The Jacobites charged the  government troops and routed them. hundreds of Government troops were killed or wounded and over 1,000 were captured. with the Jacobite losses less than 150.  With this victory Charles Edward Stuart and the Jacobite army marched southwards into England capturing the towns of Carlisle, Penrith, Lancaster and Preston and getting as far as Nottingham before lack of supplies and new recruits forced him to heads back to Scotland. Through the early morning Autumn mist, Highlanders of the Appin Regiment abandon their plaids and rush headlong across fields of stubble into the stunned ranks of Jonny Copes army. The force sent by the Crown to destroy the rebellion and capture the Pretender is itself utterly routed in a matter of minutes.  The first major engagement of the uprising is a swift and complete victory for the Princes men. Except for the garrisons of Edinburgh, Stirling, Fort William and Fort Augustus, Scotland is now under the control of the Jacobites.
The Charge of the Highlanders at the Battle of Preston Pans, by Mark Churms. (P)


Battle of Prestonpans. Bonnie Prince Charlie, after landing at Glenfinnan, in his bid to gain the British Throne. Lord George Murray with an army of 2,000 Jacobites marched southward where they were meet at Prestonpans by General Sir John Cope and a Royal army of 3,000 men On the 21st September. The Jacobites charged the government troops and routed them. hundreds of Government troops were killed or wounded and over 1,000 were captured. with the Jacobite losses less than 150. With this victory Charles Edward Stuart and the Jacobite army marched southwards into England capturing the towns of Carlisle, Penrith, Lancaster and Preston and getting as far as Nottingham before lack of supplies and new recruits forced him to heads back to Scotland. Through the early morning Autumn mist, Highlanders of the Appin Regiment abandon their plaids and rush headlong across fields of stubble into the stunned ranks of Jonny Copes army. The force sent by the Crown to destroy the rebellion and capture the Pretender is itself utterly routed in a matter of minutes. The first major engagement of the uprising is a swift and complete victory for the Princes men. Except for the garrisons of Edinburgh, Stirling, Fort William and Fort Augustus, Scotland is now under the control of the Jacobites.


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 After the unsuccessful march on London, Prince Charlie retreats to the safety of Scotland. The army regroups and more men come to join the cause, including soldiers from France. However King Georges men are never far away.  As dark, winter rain clouds draw in over the high ground above the town of Falkirk, the Jacobite army assembles to face Hang-man Hawleys dragoons and infantry. A piper plays on while the men of Ogilvys Regiment, in the second line, load and make ready their weapons for the coming assault. Bonnie Prince Charlie (so called for his nature, not his looks) rides down the ranks followed by Lord Elcho and his Life Guards. Red coated Irish Pickets, regulars from France, are also in reserve.
The Jacobite Piper by Mark Churms. (P)


After the unsuccessful march on London, Prince Charlie retreats to the safety of Scotland. The army regroups and more men come to join the cause, including soldiers from France. However King Georges men are never far away. As dark, winter rain clouds draw in over the high ground above the town of Falkirk, the Jacobite army assembles to face Hang-man Hawleys dragoons and infantry. A piper plays on while the men of Ogilvys Regiment, in the second line, load and make ready their weapons for the coming assault. Bonnie Prince Charlie (so called for his nature, not his looks) rides down the ranks followed by Lord Elcho and his Life Guards. Red coated Irish Pickets, regulars from France, are also in reserve.


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With the full might of Englands Army now gathered to do battle before the besieged Stirling Castle, the young Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory over the enemy. To the west of the Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God. The Scottish battle lines are prepared. The Cavalry is in reserve to the rear behind the spearmen and archers (known as Flower of the forest) in tightly packed Schiltrons patiently awaiting the coming onslaught. Unknown to the English, the open marshy ground of no mans land conceals hidden pits and trenches, major obstacles for any mounted charge.  Despite Cliffords and de Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve the castle the day before, years of victory have taught the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the bowmen to effectively weaken the enemy lines the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable forest of spears and into defeat and death.  With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through the mass of spears but the Scots stand firm. The momentum of the charge is lost and there is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground, casualties amongst the English are horrific. Robert Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The Englishmen are slowly pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn. All discipline is lost as the soldiers and horses madly scramble for the far bank of the burn. Many drown or perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, with his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of Stirling Castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland victory is complete.
Text by Paul Scarron-Jones.
Battle of Bannockburn by Mark Churms. (P)


With the full might of Englands Army now gathered to do battle before the besieged Stirling Castle, the young Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory over the enemy. To the west of the Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God. The Scottish battle lines are prepared. The Cavalry is in reserve to the rear behind the spearmen and archers (known as Flower of the forest) in tightly packed Schiltrons patiently awaiting the coming onslaught. Unknown to the English, the open marshy ground of no mans land conceals hidden pits and trenches, major obstacles for any mounted charge. Despite Cliffords and de Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve the castle the day before, years of victory have taught the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the bowmen to effectively weaken the enemy lines the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable forest of spears and into defeat and death. With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through the mass of spears but the Scots stand firm. The momentum of the charge is lost and there is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground, casualties amongst the English are horrific. Robert Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The Englishmen are slowly pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn. All discipline is lost as the soldiers and horses madly scramble for the far bank of the burn. Many drown or perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, with his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of Stirling Castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland victory is complete. Text by Paul Scarron-Jones.


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Supported by the Highland Chiefs with twelve hundred highlanders present. Prince Charles Edward Stuart raised his standard at Glenfinnan on the 19th August  1745. This was the start of the Forty Five which would end with the defeat of the Jacobite Army on Drumossie Moor at the battle of Culloden 16th April 1746.
Raising the Standard at Glenfinnan, by Mark Churms. (P)


Supported by the Highland Chiefs with twelve hundred highlanders present. Prince Charles Edward Stuart raised his standard at Glenfinnan on the 19th August 1745. This was the start of the Forty Five which would end with the defeat of the Jacobite Army on Drumossie Moor at the battle of Culloden 16th April 1746.


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DHM0270P. Unhooked, Kings Troop R.H.A Number 2, by Mark Churms.
Unhooked, Kings Troop R.H.A Number 2, by Mark Churms. (P)


DHM0270P. Unhooked, Kings Troop R.H.A Number 2, by Mark Churms.


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DHM259P. News from the Front by Mark Churms. (P)
News from the Front by Mark Churms. (P)


DHM259P. News from the Front by Mark Churms. (P)


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 At about 2.00pm the Union Brigade crashes through the ranks on Napoleons Ist Infantry Corps. The 2nd Royal North British Dragoons (later known as The Scots Greys) on the far left of the line, plow through Marcognets division, only Duruttes division will escape intact. With Brigade General Ponsortby at their head, elements of the now disordered Cavalry charge on to the French artillery.  Even though, at close quarters, the Gunners and attached Infantry are no match for the wild Scots, they desperately try to save their 12 pounder field pieces. However the British heavy Cavalry is now out of control and Napoleons retribution will be swift.  From the undulating ground before Paillotte comes the thunder of hooves and the deadly lances of 4th Regiment and the 3th Chasseurs a Cheval. In the confusion many of the British soldiers are completely unaware of the onslaught as the fresh French Cavalry sweeps through their flank.  Ponsonbys mount leaps through the mud as the exhausted Brigade is herded together for the final kill.  Even against all odds the brave men continue to fight. The Brigade General himself will shortly be sabred by Sergeant Urban as he attempts to capture the eagle of the 4th Lancers.
Charge of the Union Brigade by Mark Churms. (P)


At about 2.00pm the Union Brigade crashes through the ranks on Napoleons Ist Infantry Corps. The 2nd Royal North British Dragoons (later known as The Scots Greys) on the far left of the line, plow through Marcognets division, only Duruttes division will escape intact. With Brigade General Ponsortby at their head, elements of the now disordered Cavalry charge on to the French artillery. Even though, at close quarters, the Gunners and attached Infantry are no match for the wild Scots, they desperately try to save their 12 pounder field pieces. However the British heavy Cavalry is now out of control and Napoleons retribution will be swift. From the undulating ground before Paillotte comes the thunder of hooves and the deadly lances of 4th Regiment and the 3th Chasseurs a Cheval. In the confusion many of the British soldiers are completely unaware of the onslaught as the fresh French Cavalry sweeps through their flank. Ponsonbys mount leaps through the mud as the exhausted Brigade is herded together for the final kill. Even against all odds the brave men continue to fight. The Brigade General himself will shortly be sabred by Sergeant Urban as he attempts to capture the eagle of the 4th Lancers.


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Robert The Bruce dispatches Sir Henry De Bohun before the Battle of Bannockburn.  Far ahead of Edward IIs main army, marching from Falkirk to relieve Stirling Castle, rides the English vanguard. Late on that day, 23rd June 1314, these horsemen advance along the Roman road and cross Bannockburn. Eager for combat Gloucesters bold Barons and Knights spur on their chargers towards the gathered Scottish infantry. Robert the Bruce, King of Scots, not yet fully dressed for battle, sits astride a grey pony. He rides out ahead of his formations to observe the enemys advance. One of the English Knights, Sir Henry De Bohun, seeing the Kings vulnerable position, gallops ahead of his fellows to engage Bruce in single combat. Undaunted, the King holds his ground. Skillfully turning his mount away from the thrust of the Knights deadly lance in one movement he swings his battle axe down upon his enemys head with such force that the handle is shattered and the unfortunate attackers skull is split in two. In triumph, Bruce returns to the cheers of his countrymen who before the day is out will soon deliver a similar fate upon many other English noblemen. As the light fades the Riders retire but both armies know well that the main battle of Bannockburn has yet to begin.
In Single Combat by Mark Churms. (P)


Robert The Bruce dispatches Sir Henry De Bohun before the Battle of Bannockburn. Far ahead of Edward IIs main army, marching from Falkirk to relieve Stirling Castle, rides the English vanguard. Late on that day, 23rd June 1314, these horsemen advance along the Roman road and cross Bannockburn. Eager for combat Gloucesters bold Barons and Knights spur on their chargers towards the gathered Scottish infantry. Robert the Bruce, King of Scots, not yet fully dressed for battle, sits astride a grey pony. He rides out ahead of his formations to observe the enemys advance. One of the English Knights, Sir Henry De Bohun, seeing the Kings vulnerable position, gallops ahead of his fellows to engage Bruce in single combat. Undaunted, the King holds his ground. Skillfully turning his mount away from the thrust of the Knights deadly lance in one movement he swings his battle axe down upon his enemys head with such force that the handle is shattered and the unfortunate attackers skull is split in two. In triumph, Bruce returns to the cheers of his countrymen who before the day is out will soon deliver a similar fate upon many other English noblemen. As the light fades the Riders retire but both armies know well that the main battle of Bannockburn has yet to begin.


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The decisive battle of the War of the Roses was fought near Market Bosworth. Richard of Gloucester, the last Plantagenate King of England was to try consequences with Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond. The bloody conflict began in the traditional manner with the opposing armies drawn up in line. facing one another, except for the forces of Thomas Neville, Lord Stanley, as yeyt uncommitted to either side. King Richard, the Third of that name, is seated astride his grey charger in his fine blued harness. He is accompanied by his personal standard and the royal standard, alongside that of Lord Zouch to his right. His herald, trumpet are at his side. To his left Richards Chamberlain and Admiral, Viscount Lord Lovel, sits ready, astride his mount. To the rear we see the rest of the household and choice force of cavalry, kept out of shot to avoid unnecessary casualties amongst the expensive war horses.  After the opening deadly arrow storm, boys hurriedly collect fallen arrows for Richards men to shoot back. In the front line crossbowmen return fire from behind the safety of their decorated pavaises (painted with the suns and white roses of York and the white boar, Richards badge). Close by a gentleman at arms, mortally wounded by an iron ball fired from a hand gonne is dragged from the field by his page. Sir Walter Devereux (Lord Ferrers) accompanied by his standard is encouraging his household (soldiers wearing his livery colours ) to attack.  However, there is a marked reluctance on both sides to join the vicious close quarter combat of handstrokes and only in the centre is there any heavy fighting. Richard is informed by his herald that Henry and his household have been recognised and are now within charge distance. Faced with his armies reluctance to come to grips with the enemy, he decides to force battle himself by leading his own household, the Choice Force, in a desperate charge against Henry seeking to engage him in single combat.  Characteristically leading from the front Richard slays many a knight, including William Brandon (Henrys standard bearer) in his vain attempt to kill his rival. At this crucial moment Lord Stanley decides to join Henrys cause, attacks the choice force and drives it from the field. In the brutal hand to hand fighting the king is unhorsed and though surrounded, fights to the end.  -KingRichard alone was killed fighting manfully in the thickest press of his enemies - his courage was high and fierce and failed him not even at the death which when his men forsook him, he preferred to take by the sword, rather than by foul flight to prolong his life- (Polydore Virgil)
Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth, 22nd August 1485 by Mark Churms. (P)


The decisive battle of the War of the Roses was fought near Market Bosworth. Richard of Gloucester, the last Plantagenate King of England was to try consequences with Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond. The bloody conflict began in the traditional manner with the opposing armies drawn up in line. facing one another, except for the forces of Thomas Neville, Lord Stanley, as yeyt uncommitted to either side. King Richard, the Third of that name, is seated astride his grey charger in his fine blued harness. He is accompanied by his personal standard and the royal standard, alongside that of Lord Zouch to his right. His herald, trumpet are at his side. To his left Richards Chamberlain and Admiral, Viscount Lord Lovel, sits ready, astride his mount. To the rear we see the rest of the household and choice force of cavalry, kept out of shot to avoid unnecessary casualties amongst the expensive war horses. After the opening deadly arrow storm, boys hurriedly collect fallen arrows for Richards men to shoot back. In the front line crossbowmen return fire from behind the safety of their decorated pavaises (painted with the suns and white roses of York and the white boar, Richards badge). Close by a gentleman at arms, mortally wounded by an iron ball fired from a hand gonne is dragged from the field by his page. Sir Walter Devereux (Lord Ferrers) accompanied by his standard is encouraging his household (soldiers wearing his livery colours ) to attack. However, there is a marked reluctance on both sides to join the vicious close quarter combat of handstrokes and only in the centre is there any heavy fighting. Richard is informed by his herald that Henry and his household have been recognised and are now within charge distance. Faced with his armies reluctance to come to grips with the enemy, he decides to force battle himself by leading his own household, the Choice Force, in a desperate charge against Henry seeking to engage him in single combat. Characteristically leading from the front Richard slays many a knight, including William Brandon (Henrys standard bearer) in his vain attempt to kill his rival. At this crucial moment Lord Stanley decides to join Henrys cause, attacks the choice force and drives it from the field. In the brutal hand to hand fighting the king is unhorsed and though surrounded, fights to the end. -KingRichard alone was killed fighting manfully in the thickest press of his enemies - his courage was high and fierce and failed him not even at the death which when his men forsook him, he preferred to take by the sword, rather than by foul flight to prolong his life- (Polydore Virgil)


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 Icy rain adds its misery to the bitter conflict on Drumossie Moor. In the shadow of the Black Isle, two English ships on the waters of the Moray Firth, await the outcome of the decisive battle. Pounded by Cumberlands gunners and raked by steady musketry, the Princes brave men can make no headway. Although the Irish and French regulars refuse to give ground, the Jacobite lines gradually disintegrate. Tired, cold and hungry men flea past Culloden House for the relative safety of Inverness. On the Scottish right the Argyll Militia, supported by Hawleys Dragoons, tear down the walls of the Culwiniac and Culchunaig enclosures in an outflanking attack. Avochies men offer some resistance but Major Gillies McBean stands alone on the breach. He cuts down more than a dozen Argylls, including Lord Robert Kerr, who lies mortally wounded, but his foes are too many. The hero eventually falls to a vicious cut to the forehead, his thigh bone is also broken. Despite the cries of a mounted officer to save that brave man, the major is ruthlessly bayonetted, his back against the wall. The victory is complete and nothing more can be done. In the distance, the Young Pretender is forced to abandon the field and Scotlands hope of claiming the British Throne.
Battle of Culloden by Mark Churms. (P)


Icy rain adds its misery to the bitter conflict on Drumossie Moor. In the shadow of the Black Isle, two English ships on the waters of the Moray Firth, await the outcome of the decisive battle. Pounded by Cumberlands gunners and raked by steady musketry, the Princes brave men can make no headway. Although the Irish and French regulars refuse to give ground, the Jacobite lines gradually disintegrate. Tired, cold and hungry men flea past Culloden House for the relative safety of Inverness. On the Scottish right the Argyll Militia, supported by Hawleys Dragoons, tear down the walls of the Culwiniac and Culchunaig enclosures in an outflanking attack. Avochies men offer some resistance but Major Gillies McBean stands alone on the breach. He cuts down more than a dozen Argylls, including Lord Robert Kerr, who lies mortally wounded, but his foes are too many. The hero eventually falls to a vicious cut to the forehead, his thigh bone is also broken. Despite the cries of a mounted officer to save that brave man, the major is ruthlessly bayonetted, his back against the wall. The victory is complete and nothing more can be done. In the distance, the Young Pretender is forced to abandon the field and Scotlands hope of claiming the British Throne.


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 Captain Montague Lind, leading a Squadron of the 1st Life Guards against the 12th regiment of Cuirassiers during the battle of waterloo, Hougoumont Farm can be seen in the distance.
Charge of the Life Guards by Mark Churms. (P)


Captain Montague Lind, leading a Squadron of the 1st Life Guards against the 12th regiment of Cuirassiers during the battle of waterloo, Hougoumont Farm can be seen in the distance.


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 Marshal Ney charging at the head of the French cavalry against the British Squares. Of all Napoleons Generals at Waterloo none distinguished himself more than Marshal Ney, Prince of the Moskowa, the splendid warrior upon whom his Imperial master had conferred the proud title of Le Brave des Braves (The Bravest of the Brave) Twice he led the attack on the British centre, first at the head of the cavalry and then with the Old Guard, and he only retired from the field at nightfall, after five horses had been killed under him.
Marshal Ney at the Battle of Waterloo by Mark Churms. (P)


Marshal Ney charging at the head of the French cavalry against the British Squares. Of all Napoleons Generals at Waterloo none distinguished himself more than Marshal Ney, Prince of the Moskowa, the splendid warrior upon whom his Imperial master had conferred the proud title of Le Brave des Braves (The Bravest of the Brave) Twice he led the attack on the British centre, first at the head of the cavalry and then with the Old Guard, and he only retired from the field at nightfall, after five horses had been killed under him.


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